Gallery: Wisconsin Landsat Satellite Imagery

This image gallery provides examples of Landsat-5 and -7 imagery for a variety of sites in Wisconsin. All images were processed by Jon Chipman formerly of the University of Wisconsin Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView. Please feel free to use these images, with credit to "UW SSEC and WisconsinView." Thanks for your interest in Landsat views of Wisconsin!

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the communities of Ashland (lower left) and Washburn (upper left), on the shores of Chequamegon Bay. Chequamegon Point separates the bay from the open waters of Lake Superior (upper right). To the east of Ashland, the Bad River (right) flows north, through the coastal wetland complexes of Kakagon Slough and Bad River Slough. On the date this image was acquired, the river was carrying a heavy load of suspended sediment, as indicated by its red/brown appearance in the image. This heavy sediment load may have resulted from large thunderstorms that passed through northern Wisconsin the previous day; much of the region experienced heavy rainfall, and a tornado caused significant damage near Ladysmith (south of the area shown here). This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 3, 2002. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the communities of Duluth, Minnesota (top, north of St. Louis Bay) and Superior, Wisconsin (center, south of the bay), at the westernmost end of Lake Superior. This area is an important shipping center for the western Great Lakes region. On the date this image was acquired, rivers in this area were carrying a heavy load of suspended sediment, as indicated by its red/brown appearance in the image. This heavy sediment load may have resulted from large thunderstorms that passed through northern Wisconsin the previous day; much of the region experienced heavy rainfall, and a tornado caused significant damage near Ladysmith (south of the area shown here). This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 3, 2002. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a broad-scale view of central Wisconsin's agricultural heartland, including portions of Clark, Taylor, Marathon, and Wood counties. The city of Marshfield is visible in the lower right corner of the image, with Abbotsford and Medford in the center and upper-center portions of the image, respectively. The regular grid pattern of the road network in this area results from the Public Land Survey System (PLSS), with most roads following the one-mile PLSS section lines. The dominant land use in this region is dairy farming. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a representative portion of Wisconsin's agricultural heartland, covering part of eastern Clark County. The town of Greenwood is in the lower left corner of the image; Loyal is in the lower center; and part of Colby is at the extreme upper right. The regular grid pattern of the road network in this area results from the Public Land Survey System (PLSS), with most roads following the one-mile PLSS section lines. The dominant land use in this region is dairy farming. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the northeastern end of Door County, Wisconsin, with Washington Island (center), Rock Island (upper right), and adjacent small islands in Lake Michigan. Shallow areas around the Door Peninsula and the islands appear very bright, due to sunlight passing through the very clear water of Lake Michigan and reflecting off the bright-colored sand or limestone bedrock at the bottom. The dark line crossing near the top of the image is the result of a "line drop", or missing data (an infrequent occurrence in satellite imaging systems). This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 8, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows part of Door County, Wisconsin, located on a peninsula between Lake Michigan (lower right) and Green Bay (upper left). Prominent features visible along the Lake Michigan shore include Rowley Bay (upper right), North Bay, Moonlight Bay, and Bailey's Harbor (bottom right). On the Green Bay side, Ellison Bay, Sister Bay, Eagle Harbor, and Fish Creek are visible from north to south. Peninsula State Park is located on the prominent peninsula at left-center, surrounded by several small islands. Shallow areas along the eastern shoreline appear very bright, due to sunlight passing through the very clear water of Lake Michigan and reflecting off the bright-colored sand or limestone bedrock at the bottom. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 8, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows part of Door County, Wisconsin, located on a peninsula between Lake Michigan (lower right) and Green Bay (upper left). Prominent features visible along the Lake Michigan shore include Moonlight Bay and Bailey's Harbor (upper right), Kangaroo Lake, and Clark Lake and Whitefish Bay (lower center). On the Green Bay side, Egg Harbor is located at upper left. Shallow areas along the eastern shoreline appear very bright, due to sunlight passing through the very clear water of Lake Michigan and reflecting off the bright-colored sand or limestone bedrock at the bottom. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 8, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows part of Door County, Wisconsin, located on a peninsula between Lake Michigan (lower right) and Green Bay (upper left). The city of Sturgeon Bay is located on the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, near the center of this image. Shallow areas along the eastern shoreline appear very bright, due to sunlight passing through the very clear water of Lake Michigan and reflecting off the bright-colored sand or limestone bedrock at the bottom. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 8, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the cities of Neenah, Menasha, Appleton, and Kaukauna, located at the northern end of Lake Winnebago and along the Lower Fox River. The portion of the Fox River between Lake Winnebago and Green Bay has 12 dams, and is home to the world's highest concentration of pulp and paper mills. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 27, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, located on the western shore of Lake Winnebago. Oshkosh is home to the annual gatherings of the Experimental Aircraft Association (now known as EAA AirVenture Oshkosh). The channel between Lake Butte des Morts (left) and Lake Winnebago (right) runs through the center of the city. A motorboat on Lake Winnebago is visible as a small, bright dot, trailing a long V-shaped wake. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 27, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, located at the southern end of Lake Winnebago. Lake Winnebago is the largest "inland" lake in Wisconsin, stretching 45 km (28 miles) north to south and 16 km (10 miles) east to west. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 27, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the Baraboo Hills region in south-central Wisconsin. The Hills appear as a dark-green, forested area stretching from lower left to upper right. Devil's Lake State Park is located near the center of the image. The town of Baraboo is in the upper center, and the former Badger Army Ammunition Plant is at lower center, near the Wisconsin River. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 2, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around the community of Eagle River in northern Wisconsin. Numerous lakes appear throughout this area, with their different colors resulting from each lake's particular combination of water clarity, chlorophyll concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. A mixture of different forest types are present in the area, ranging from pine barrens to northern hardwoods. At upper right, hardwood trees growing on glacial "drumlins" (linear hills) are visible in pale green and yellow, due to the colorful fall foliage at this early October date. The alignment of the drumlins (from northeast to southwest) reflects the direction in which the ice sheet was moving during the most recent glacial epoch. In the lower center portion of the image, some commercial cranberry bogs are visible. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 6, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around the town of Rhinelander in northern Wisconsin. A mixture of different forest types are present in the area; deciduous species are visible in pale green, yellow, and orange, due to the colorful fall foliage at this early October date. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 6, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around the communities of Minocqua and Woodruff in north-central Wisconsin. A mixture of different forest types are present in the area; deciduous species are visible in pale green, yellow, and orange, due to the colorful fall foliage at this early October date. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 6, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around Trout Lake in northern Wisconsin. The community of Boulder Junction is located near the top of this image, while most of the surrounding area lies within the Northern Highlands State Forest. Numerous lakes appear throughout this area, with their different colors resulting from each lake's particular combination of water clarity, chlorophyll concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. The North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research Site (NTL-LTER) conducts scientific research on seven "primary study" lakes in this area, including Trout Lake itself. The various colors present across the landscape indicate different forest types. Prominent brown/orange oval shapes scattered around the left side of the image are glacial "drumlins" (linear hills) with mixed hardwood species whose leaves are changing colors on this early October date. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 6, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Environmental Remote Sensing Center.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around the Lac du Flambeau tribal reservation in north-central Wisconsin. Numerous lakes appear throughout this area, with their different colors resulting from each lake's particular combination of water clarity, chlorophyll concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. The largest lake in this image is Fence Lake, located at the center-right portion of the image. A mixture of different forest types are present in the area; deciduous species are visible in pale green, yellow, and orange, due to the colorful fall foliage at this early October date. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 6, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around Manitowish Waters in north-central Wisconsin. The Manitowish Lakes chain is located in the center of the image, including Island Lake, Clear Lake, Rest Lake, Manitowish Lake, and others. To the south, Little Trout Lake and Ike Walton Lake (on the edge of this image) are surrounded by Powell Marsh, a vast non-forested peatland wetland complex. Linear patterns within Powell Marsh are primarily caused by old drainage ditches, and indicate the complex hydrology of this wetland. Extensive commercial cranberry beds are located on the northern shore of Little Trout Lake. Cranberries are harvested in the early autumn, typically by flooding the beds in which they are grown and causing the bright red berries to float to the surface. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 6, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison, Wisconsin's state capital, situated on an isthmus between Lakes Mendota (center) and Monona (center-right). Other lakes in the region include Lake Wingra (the smaller lake just south of Lake Mendota) and Lake Waubesa (lower right). The University of Wisconsin (Madison) is located along the southern shore of Lake Mendota. In this late winter/early spring image, most fields are bare in the agricultural areas surrounding the city, and Lake Mendota is still partially ice-covered. However, cool-season grasses are starting to turn green on golf courses and in parks. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on March 7, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison (see caption for March 7 image). By late April, the ice has melted on all the lakes, and grassy areas in parks, golf courses, and residential neighborhoods are rapidly turning green, but most agricultural fields are still brown. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on April 24, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison (see caption for March 7 image). In this late July image, trees appear dark green; agricultural fields appear lighter green; and the Madison lakes appear blue-green or green due to chlorophyll in algae. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 27, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison (see caption for March 7 image). In this mid-October image, most deciduous trees have turned dark brown, while wetlands, and grassy areas, are still green. Lake Mendota has become somewhat darker, due to higher water clarity than in mid-summer, but Lake Wingra is still green in color. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 15, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Environmental Remote Sensing Center.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison (see caption for March 7 image). On the date this image was acquired (October 31), a large algal bloom was occurring on Lake Mendota. The algal bloom is visible in this image as a dark green pattern in the middle of the lake; this pattern results from floating algae that are blown by the wind and accumulate in large linear floating mats. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 31, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison, using the 15-meter resolution "panchromatic" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to a single, broad range of wavelengths of visible and near-infrared light, resulting in black-and-white imagery, with a finer spatial resolution than the "multispectral" (color) bands, which have a 30-meter resolution. Thus, in this image, many finer details can be seen, including individual buildings and individual small streets in residential neighborhoods, which may not be discernable in the color images elsewhere in this image gallery. Many features are also visible in the wetlands surrounding Lake Wingra (center). This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 15, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Madison, using the 60-meter resolution "thermal-infrared" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to thermal radiation (heat) emitted by objects. In general, in this image, warmer objects tend to appear brighter, while cooler objects appear darker. Thus, for example, the Madison lakes appear darker than most of the surrounding landscape, because at the time this image was acquired (mid-day), the lakes were cooler than the land. However, the amount of radiation emitted by an object is also affected by its "emissivity", a physical property of all materials. Thus, buildings with metal roofs - which have very low emissivity - also appear very dark, even though they may be relatively warm. Many such buildings are visible around the area, particularly along a north-south line to the east of Lake Monona. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on October 15, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The Eau Claire River (right) flows into the Chippewa River. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Environmental Remote Sensing Center.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the Menominee Reservation in northeastern Wisconsin. The heavily-forested reservation contrasts sharply with the surrounding areas. Shawano Lake is located at the lower right corner of this image, near the town of Shawano. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 27, 1999. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a broad-scale view of the city of Milwaukee and surrounding areas along the western shore of Lake Michigan. The image - a small part of a single Landsat-7 scene - covers the area from Mequon (top) to South Milwaukee (bottom). This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 9, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows an enlargement of the central portion of the city of Milwaukee, on the western shore of Lake Michigan. Large structures associated with the port are visible in this 30-meter resolution image, though many smaller features cannot be discerned. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 9, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows an enlargement of the central portion of the city of Milwaukee, using the 15-meter resolution "panchromatic" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to a single, broad range of wavelengths of visible and near-infrared light, resulting in black-and-white imagery, with a finer spatial resolution than the "multispectral" (color) bands, which have a 30-meter resolution. Thus, in this image, many finer details can be seen, including individual buildings. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 9, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of Green Bay, Wisconsin, located at the southern end of the bay of the same name. The bay - an arm of Lake Michigan - is the largest estuarine system in the Great Lakes. The green color of the bay results from chlorophyll present in algae. Near the upper right corner of this image, a ship is visible within the Green Bay Navigation Channel; it appears as a small white "dash". The city's airport is located at the left-center portion of the image. The lower Fox River flows through the center of the city and enters the bay; suspended solids discharged from the Fox River are a major contributor to water quality concerns in the bay. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 8, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows an enlargement of the city of Green Bay, using the 15-meter resolution "panchromatic" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to a single, broad range of wavelengths of visible and near-infrared light, resulting in black-and-white imagery, with a finer spatial resolution than the "multispectral" (color) bands, which have a 30-meter resolution. Thus, in this image, many finer details can be seen, including individual buildings. Lambeau Field, home of the Green Bay Packers, is located in the lower left quadrant of this image. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 9, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the towns of Cable (upper right) and Hayward (lower left) in northwestern Wisconsin. The route of the American Birkebeiner - the longest cross-country ski race in North America - runs for ~52 km from Cable to Hayward. Modeled after the original Birkebeiner race in Norway, this event draws thousands of skiers and spectators to northwestern Wisconsin every year. On the early-spring date of this image, ice is still visible on Round Lake (lower right), but other lakes appear ice-free. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on April 25, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the towns of Cable (upper right) and Hayward (lower left) in northwestern Wisconsin. The route of the American Birkebeiner - the longest cross-country ski race in North America - runs for 51 km from Cable to Hayward (see caption for April image). The dark blue/purple patterns visible on some lakes in this image (from early September) are the result of wind-driven waves. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 3, 2002. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows Horicon Marsh, located in eastern Wisconsin. Horicon Marsh is the largest freshwater cattail marsh in the US. The northern portion of the marsh is a National Wildlife Refuge, while the southern portion is a State Wildlife Area. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 2, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows Lake Koshkonong, a large lake in southeastern Wisconsin. This image is from the the 15-meter resolution "panchromatic" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to a single, broad range of wavelengths of visible and near-infrared light, resulting in black-and-white imagery, with a finer spatial resolution than the "multispectral" (color) bands, which have a 30-meter resolution. Thus, in this image, many finer details can be seen, including numerous small water bodies in the wetlands surrounding the lake. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on July 9, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a regional view of the area around La Crosse, Wisconsin. The city of La Crosse is near the center of the image; to the north lie North La Crosse and Onalaska. The town of Trempealeau and Perrot State Park are located in the upper left corner of the image. The many channels and islands of the Mississippi River are visible, with the river flowing from the upper left to the lower right corner of the image. Much of the land along this portion of the river is included in the Upper Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the city of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and adjacent wetlands along the Mississippi River. Much of the land along this portion of the river is included in the Upper Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the complexity of the wetlands complex south of La Crosse along the Mississippi River. The image was acquired using the the 15-meter resolution "panchromatic" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to a single, broad range of wavelengths of visible and near-infrared light, resulting in black-and-white imagery, with a finer spatial resolution than the "multispectral" (color) bands, which have a 30-meter resolution. Thus, in this image, many finer details can be seen, including numerous small channels and inlets in the wetlands along the river. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, where the Wisconsin River (right) flows into the Mississippi River. Wyalusing State Park is located on the bluffs south of the Wisconsin River, La Crosse along the Mississippi River. The image was acquired using the the 15-meter resolution "panchromatic" band on Landsat-7. This band is sensitive to a single, broad range of wavelengths of visible and near-infrared light, resulting in black-and-white imagery, with a finer spatial resolution than the "multispectral" (color) bands, which have a 30-meter resolution. Thus, in this image, many finer details can be seen, including numerous small channels in the wetlands along the two rivers. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on August 8, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows the area around Peshtigo, Wisconsin. The town of Peshtigo is located at the left-center of the image, while Marinette (Wisconsin) and Menominee (Michigan) are in the upper right corner. The Peshtigo River flows through the center of the image, entering Green Bay near Peshtigo Point (lower right). The Peshtigo Reef Light can be seen as a small, bright dot at the outer end of the submerged Peshtigo Reef. Peshtigo was the setting for the largest wildfire in US history, which occurred on October 8, 1871 - the same day as the better-known but much less deadly Chicago Fire. Somewhere between 1200 and 2400 lives were lost in the Peshtigo Fire, and over 1 million acres of forest and farmland were burned. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 8, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a portion of the lower Wisconsin River, and the adjacent "Driftless Area". Towns visible in this image include Spring Green (right), Lone Rock (center), and Gotham (upper left). Taliesin, the home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, is located south of the Wisconsin River near Spring Green. Bordering the river are floodplain forests (dark brown) and agricultural fields, including many circular center-pivot irrigation fields. In this late winter/early spring image, most fields are bare, or only light-green in color. Away from the river and its floodplain, most of this image shows the unglaciated "Driftless Area", an area of steep-sided, dendritic valleys and hills. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on March 7, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a portion of the lower Wisconsin River, and the adjacent "Driftless Area" (see caption for March 7 image). In this mid-spring image, most fields are rapidly turning green, but most forested areas have not yet "leafed out" and thus appear brown. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on April 24, 2000. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)

This Landsat-7 satellite image shows a portion of the lower Wisconsin River, and the adjacent "Driftless Area" (see caption for March 7 image). In this late summer image, forests appear dark green, while agricultural fields appear light green, brown, or white, depending on soil and vegetation conditions. Sandbars along the lower Wisconsin River appear very bright. This image was acquired by Landsat-7 on September 2, 2001. (Image courtesy University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center and WisconsinView.)
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